vacation cabin rental

The Giant Sequoia Tree - Nature's Largest Living Thing

If you have never seen one it is quite a site to behold. The Giant Sequoia tree is truly a marvel of nature. The tree can grow to a height of over 300 feet and some can have a diameter of over 30 feet at their base. Some Giant Sequoias are known to be over 3,200 years old making them among the oldest living organisms on the planet.

The trees have are only found in their natural environment in the western Sierra Nevada mountains in California. Experimental plantings have been started in places such as Pennsylvania, Rhode Island, New York and Vermont, but of course none of these trees even comes close to the size of the ones you will find in California.

I have had the privilege to see the Grizzly Giant in the Mariposa Grove in Yosemite National Park and it is incredible. The base measures 28 feet in diameter and the first branch on the tree is about 100 feet up and is 6 feet in diameter. Here are some pictures of Giant Sequoias below taken by various people and posted at Flickr.com. Enjoy them, but try to make a trip to California some day to see the real thing.

Recent Uploads tagged sequoia and tree

Abbey Road in the California redwoods

PeterThoeny posted a photo:

Abbey Road in the California redwoods

Visiting nearby Big Basin Redwoods State Park is always a treat. On Saturday we went from the Silicon Valley over the hill towards the California coast and made a stop at this park. It was a wet day, which gave a mystical experience.

I processed a balanced, a paintery, and a photographic HDR photo from a RAW exposure, merged them selectively, and carefully adjusted the color balance and curves. I welcome and appreciate constructive feedback.

Thank you for visiting - ? with gratitude! Fave if you like it, add comments below, like the Facebook page, order beautiful HDR prints at qualityHDR.com.

-- ?/5.6, 19 mm, 1/8 sec, ISO 200, Sony A6000, SEL-P1650, HDR, 1 RAW exposure, _DSC6710_hdr1bal1pai1pho1g.jpg
-- CC BY-NC-SA 4.0, © Peter Thoeny, Quality HDR Photography



The Mighty Sequoia

Todd Danger Farr posted a photo:

The Mighty Sequoia

www.farrframeworks.com/photography



Agassiz Tree

www78 posted a photo:

Agassiz Tree

Named for Swiss Zoologist Louis Agassiz, the 76.2m tall and 7.6m diameter Giant Sequoia is the largest in the park and is currently the 36th largest multicellular organism on Earth by volume.
Calaveras Big Trees State Park, Arnold, California



Palace Hotel Tree

www78 posted a photo:

Palace Hotel Tree

The Palace Hotel Tree was named in the 1970s by visitors who compared its large cavernous opening to the ostentatious courtyard of the Palace Hotel in San Francisco.
Calaveras Big Trees State Park, Arnold, California



Up

Kurt Lawson posted a photo:

Up

Look up! Standing between two giants, I looked up to see this. Like virtually any other giant, the one I was closest to shows signs of battle damage. Battle with fire. But, this tree has persevered since that damage for centuries as it continues to reach higher and higher and wider. Dwarfing me and my comparatively tiny self, in stature and in lifespan, I pondered the stories they would tell if I could speak to the trees. But I was mistaken, since like the scar of the long gone fire, trees have much to tell us about our world. These superlative trees I adore. How foolish the first non-native people were to look at these trees as anything other than trees to be admired and revered. From when I first learned of their existence to when I first encountered one in person almost 20 years ago, I have never understood how one might seek to fell a giant tree that has stood for millennia for lumber. I hope the trees outlast our shortsightedness.



Giant Sequoia

Jolita Kievi?ien? posted a photo:

Giant Sequoia

Kings Canyon National Park, California



Foot of a Giant

matthias7m posted a photo:

Foot of a Giant

At the foot of a Giant, Sequoia tree, possibly 3.000 years old - Am Fuße eines Giganten. Mammutbaum, möglicherweise 3.000 Jahre alt.



I Dreamed We Ran Away

Calpastor posted a photo:

I Dreamed We Ran Away

California's Sierra Nevada Mountains



Towering Above All Else

Calpastor posted a photo:

Towering Above All Else

Giant Sequoia Tree



FXT21738.jpg

Rob_377 posted a photo:

FXT21738.jpg



tree eats rock

citizensunshine posted a photo:

tree eats rock

At Sequoia National Park, just off of Round Meadow. Our family, without fail, traverses the ovoid trail around Round Meadow, which used to be called the Round Meadow trail, but now is called the Big Trees Trail, because . . . things. Sequoia trees are famously fluid in growing around obstacles, and this specimen's approach yielded a most peculiar impression: that of an animate tree devouring the rock beside it. If you look creatively, you can see couple dark spots just above and to the right of the rock serving as eyes; an aquiline ridge between them forming the nose, and the protuberance around the meeting of rock and tree reminiscent of bulbous lips slurping in the boulder. And the exposed roots have the appearance of tentacled legs pulling its meal in.

Once you see it, you can't un-see it.

What can eat a boulder? Why, the biggest trees on earth, of course.



SEQUOIA

novaexpress93 posted a photo:

SEQUOIA



sunset on three rivers

citizensunshine posted a photo:

sunset on three rivers

Just outside of Sequoia National Park lies the mountain hamlet of Three Rivers, so named for the three forks of the mighty Kaweah River that carved much of the stark geography of Sequoia itself. We were exiting because of a pile-up on the road into the park occasioned by the governmental shutdown's putting rangers on furlough; we were hopeful, however, that we would be able to reascend in the morning once the accident had been cleared. We were not the only ones descending it frustration, however, and we had already stopped at four motels, inns, caravanserai, and the like looking in vain for last minute lodgings. At last we found one on our fifth try -- only for my parents to reveal that this was, inauspiciously enough, the same motel they had stayed at on an abortive visit decades ago, when my father had promptly thrown out his back on arrival to the motel, ending the expedition.

I'm happy to report no such mishaps on this occasion -- and that we did gain admittance to the park the following morning. Alas, we were amongst the last: after a few more accidents the Park Service determined it too dangerous to keep the park open without staffing, and it was shuttered entirely after New Year's.



sunset on sequoia

citizensunshine posted a photo:

sunset on sequoia

Our family, of course, makes its annual solstitial pilgrimage to Sequoia each year, and 2018 was no different. Except for one thing: the federal goverment had recently shuttered in an act of political self-destruction, and with it went the rangers who typically run the national parks. Unlike the 2013 shutdown (alas, these things are frequent enough that they can be referred to so casually), the initial intent was to leave the parks open, but this quickly led to problems. In our case, a cold snap had left the only winding mountain road into the park slick with black ice, and after a series of cars careened off the road -- which had gone untreated thanks to the lack of personnel -- the authorities were compelled to close the road. We discovered this via a four-hour traffic jam on said road, after which we drove rather sadly back down the mountain to find the sun setting over the lower altitudes. We had actually stopped because there is no mobile service in the park, and the ranger station (locked up) represented the first pay phone we could use to try to call in and see what had happened. A pay phone! Seriously! A pay phone.

Sunset on Sequoia indeed.



Sequoia sempervirens, COAST REDWOOD

openspacer posted a photo:

Sequoia sempervirens, COAST REDWOOD

Sequoia sempervirens, COAST REDWOOD. Leaves and cone. Old Haul Road, Pescadero Creek Park.



Old redwood stump showing slots cut for boards

openspacer posted a photo:

Old redwood stump showing slots cut for boards

Old redwood stump showing slots cut for boards. Old-time loggers had to stand on boards to position themselves to use their crosscut saws to fell the huge trees. Pescadero Creek Park.



General Sherman

garciacaleb202 posted a photo:

General Sherman



Géant a terre

jerome83210 posted a photo:

Géant a terre



North_Wales_0056

Blaise Olivier posted a photo:

North_Wales_0056

Métaséquoia du Sechuan, Metasequoia glyptostroboides.



Bodnant Garden, North Wales.

Blaise Olivier posted a photo:

Bodnant Garden, North Wales.

Sequoia tree.